Arbitration Clause

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Arbitration Clause

A clause in a contract stating that, in the event of a dispute, parties shall follow an extrajudicial means of resolution in which they make their cases before an impartial person or panel. The clause may also indicate the specific process the parties shall follow in the event of arbitration. The clause is intended to save both parties the time and expense of a lawsuit.
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Finally, 20.9 percent (18 of 86) of the arbitration clauses in the
In that case, the Supreme Court ruled that arbitration clauses in the employment contracts of three different employers were enforceable as written, in particular upholding provisions waiving the employee's right to pursue a claim as a member of a class action.
In essence, courts have concluded that if parties entered into an agreement to arbitrate disputes they should defer to the parties' judgment and enforce any arbitration clauses contained in the agreements.
Before you can even get to the actual case, you've got to beat the arbitration clause."
The Advocate General concluded that the effectiveness of Article 101 TFEU does not, in itself and as a general principle, preclude the implementation of arbitration clauses in the context of an action for damages for breaches of that Article.
The Defendant pleaded that the mechanism agreed upon between the parties, as per the arbitration clause inserted in the Shareholders Agreement -- with regards to the appointment of the arbitrators -- should be duly respected.
District Court for the Southern District of New York evaluated the position that applicable state law barred the enforcement of an arbitration clause but found that the application of federal law requiring arbitration did not contravene state law.
The Supreme Court has undermined the ability to challenge the arbitration clauses themselves as unconscionable in its AT&T Mobile, LLP v.
Forced arbitration clauses require consumers to give up their rights to go to court and seek redress for damages they have suffered as a result of unlawful practices by corporations.
A group of insurance policy purchasers and rival insurance agents who are suing a gaggle of big insurance companies for allegedly failing to train and supervise an insurance broker who committed fraud will not be bound by a mandatory arbitration clause in the contract between the brokerage and the insurance companies whose policies they sold, the South Carolina Supreme Court has ruled.
'Thus, even if the loan agreements with China do not contain the waiver-of-immunity provision, the arbitration clause in the accords already imply a waiver of immunity from suit,' Agabin added.