board of arbitration

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Board of Arbitration

A panel of impartial persons appointed to resolve a dispute in an extrajudicial process. There are generally three arbitrators, but there may be up to five. Parties in arbitration agree to allow the decision of the board of arbitration to be binding and to forego the right to an appeal.

board of arbitration

A group of three to five people selected to arbitrate disputes between securities firms. The board's rulings are final for disputes in which both parties have agreed to arbitration.
References in classic literature ?
"Mais pardon, il est un petit peu toque; he maintains, for instance, that district councils and arbitration boards are all of no use, and he is unwilling to take part in anything."
The cabinet also approved arbitration boards to resolve the grievances of staff in Medical Teaching Institutes adding the boards would be headed by retired high court judges.
As for the Court's current disposition regarding the jurisdiction of arbitration boards, Chief Justice MacLachlin in Weber v.
Keshavjee worked with the Ismaili Muslim Conciliation and Arbitration Boards, developing and delivering training for ADR practitioners in fourteen countries.
Harb said the draft law also incorporates judgments handed down by labor arbitration boards, and seeks to clear up problems of interpretation by introducing clear definitions of labor-related concepts.
In many areas of the law, including human rights law, individuals may be able to seek a legal remedy from more than one body (e.g., human rights commissions, labour arbitration boards, or civil or criminal courts) depending on their circumstances.
Jews have operated private rabbinic courts in the province for decades and Ismaili Muslims have used Conciliation and Arbitration Boards since 1987, The rulings have been legally binding since 1992.
American and Canadian studies of ordinary discipline cases also show that arbitration boards generally take the employees' past loyalty and obedience into consideration when making their decisions.
Trade unions were recognized, and workers' committees and arbitration boards were established.
"The more arbitration boards we have, the more we are going to limit the creative process.
In lieu of written opinions the SEC suggested that arbitration boards make available a summary of the legal issues, the outcome, and the amount of any awards.