a priori

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a priori

adj. known to be true, independently of the subject under debate. Economists frequently develop their theoretical models by reasoning, deductively, from certain prior assumptions to general predictions.

For example, operating on the assumption that consumers behave rationally in seeking to maximize their utility from a limited income, economists’ reasoning leads them to the prediction that consumers will tend to buy more of those products whose relative price has fallen. See ECONOMIC MAN, CONSUMER EQUILIBRIUM

References in periodicals archive ?
It may feed the suspicion that reparation after an offence is actually a more evident idea than the intentional infliction of pain after the offence but that this idea is suppressed by centuries of punitive apriorism.
However, instead of combining apriorism with mathematicism and Platonism, Feyerabend combines it with rhetoricism and anarchism.
67) Isn't this the apriorism that Carroll decries in others?
David Baguley suggests that the Anglophobia in these passages--criticisms of the British appear in fact on every page of the micro-plan (1516-20)--serves a utopian apriorism according to which no valid counter-example to the utopian exemplar exists: "Les Evangiles vont deja dans le sens de l'utopie par la maniere dont ils cultivent la partialite et eliminent methodiquement toute opposition .
As Frederick Crews has persuasively argued, secularist Theory is "bogged down in apriorism.
They further argue that in spite of his extreme apriorism (in which all economic laws can be derived from the principle of human action), the implications of his work can be seen as radically empirical, a point they suggest is often missed by his allies and detractors alike.
One paradigm was based on Rothbard's (10) extreme apriorism (and it remains to be seen to which extent Rothbard makes an appropriate interpretation of Mises).
Such mechanical apriorism is what many contemporary literary theorists imagine morality to be, and, not surprisingly, they reject it.
Even as it avoids the apriorism that sometimes characterizes Habermas's decline narrative in Structural Transformation, Dewey's theory of the public sphere generates its own set of concerns.
As Zahar presents it, the synthetic apriorism is rather a concession: constructivism won't get you all that you want (for example, the Axioms of Choice and Reducibility), so we must postulate some nonconstructive principles to make up for it.
To insist that such restricted representations are required by human thought would be to commit apriorism no less egregiously than did Kant, as we can now say with hindsight,(10) when he argued that space and time 'must' be Euclidean lest we not be able to form a coherent conception of a located material object.
One cannot raise any questions about apriorism, the crassness of all he takes for granted, the seemingly overlooked necessities for reflexivity, and a few other expectations for proper knowledge as cherished by social science.