Appropriation Bill

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Appropriation Bill

Legislation that authorizes the government to spend money from the public treasury for a certain purpose. For example, an appropriation bill may enable the defense ministry to fund the military's activities for the year. If the amount authorized in all appropriation bills in a year exceeds the revenue the government collects, then the government goes into deficit. In many countries, appropriation bills must originate in the lower house of the legislature.
References in periodicals archive ?
None of the regular appropriations bills have been enacted as of the date of this report.
The House Appropriations Committee released a draft Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education appropriations bill in late September that would fund the NIH at $31.
Despite assurances the bill would be completed prior to the start of the new fiscal year on October 1, due to political wrangling in the Senate over total federal discretionary spending, it was reported the full Senate might not take up any appropriations bills prior to October 1.
Each year, federal funding for education is bundled with two other federal agencies in the form of a Labor/Health and Human Services/Education appropriations bill.
A presidential veto of the Labor-HHS bill would leave the Congress with three choices: to attempt to override his veto; to pass a massive omnibus appropriations bill that includes Labor-HHS funding; or to reduce overall spending by $27 billion to match the President's recommended funding levels.
Vista Controls in Santa Clarita, for example, donated $11,550 to McKeon, and this year won $2 million in the defense appropriations bill to make electronic upgrades to heavy armored vehicles.
Another CR will be passed by 18 Nov 05 for the appropriations that remain unfinished, including the FY06 Defense Appropriations bill.
The Congress did not complete action on the Omnibus Appropriations Bill, which included full FY 2004 funding for HAVA implementation.
Congress' debate over the FY 2003 Omnibus Appropriations bill covered all appropriations bills for federal programs, including the Interior Appropriations bill that funds the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and other natural resource management programs.
If those 11 appropriations bills are not completed quickly, Congress may opt to roll them into funding bills for fiscal 2004.
That is, is the item veto a restraint on the use of appropriations bills for the purpose of legislating rather than just appropriating?