Applied mathematics

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Applied mathematics

The study of the application of mathematical principles to domains outside of mathematics itself.  Although the branches of mathematics within this categorization change with time, applied mathematics typically involves the use of differential equations, numerical analysis, and statistics with areas of knowledge such as engineering, biology, physics, computer science, economics, and finance.
References in periodicals archive ?
De Witt Sumners, an applied mathematician at Florida State University in Tallahassee, says he was not surprised that knots would form in a box.
The field of computer chess got its start in 1950 with the ideas of applied mathematician Claude E.
The current or eddy field acts like an optical lens to focus the wave action, says applied mathematician Bengt Fornberg of the University of Colorado at Boulder.
The rules completely guarantee the final shell shape," says applied mathematician Bonnie A.
Applied mathematician Joan and John (emeritus, mechanical engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State U.
A Russian native in the US since 1990, applied mathematician Mitlin shares insights he has acquired working in high-technology companies, most importantly that fine-tuning digital communications systems requires a balance between analytical methods and simulations.
This seems to be very different from the way we teach science and engineering, especially to undergraduates, but this is not so different from the way we do research," says applied mathematician Philip J.
This explanation has enormous appeal in the mathematical and scientific community," observes applied mathematician P.
Without a visual display such as a rugged fitness landscape; its difficult to intuit why some mutations are more adaptive than others, adds applied mathematician Alan S.
They form an outstanding ecosystem for training the next generation of applied mathematicians, computer scientists and engineers for achieving our scientific breakthroughs, and who are equipped with a double career advantage: excellent research training, and exposure to industrial research environments through a nexus of secondments among Universities, Research and Innovation Centers, and industrial teams.
of York, Britain), and attributes that to its being considered classical, so old fashion, and because it was generally developed by engineers and applied mathematicians, so grew up on the wrong side of the academic tracks.
Page=News&storyID=14590) research of Peter Dodds and Chris Danforth, two applied mathematicians at the University of Vermont's Complex Systems Center.

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