Antitrust Law


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Related to Antitrust Law: contract law, Competition law

Antitrust Law

Any law opposing trusts, monopolies, and other organizations or practices deemed to be anti-competitive. Antitrust laws especially refer to laws forbidding price-fixing contracts, price discrimination, and tying. Proponents of antitrust laws believe they increase competition, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
(81) Major League Baseball countered with an argument for a broad, all-encompassing exemption under which all aspects of the "business of baseball," including league structure and franchise location, are exempt from antitrust law challenges.
Although federal antitrust law has become a means for the strong to dominate the weak, it was originally enacted to help balance power in society.
1 (1911): One of the earliest examples of the government's use of antitrust laws. In the late 1880s, Standard Oil (owned by John D.
substantive scope of antitrust law. (18) Since the Great Recession,
In addition, merely inviting a competitor to enter into an illegal agreement may violate the antitrust laws, even if the invitation does not result in an agreement to fix wages or otherwise limit competition.
Courts must consider antitrust law standards and limitations in their judicial analyses.
.FTC was repeatedly rebuffed by the courts when it last tried to reach well beyond settled principles of antitrust law in asserting its Section 5 authority.
There has been some push for international antitrust law to begin dealing with international antitrust issues.
The NC Board argued it was not subject to antitrust laws, but the FTC and the courts disagreed, holding that the NC Board unlawfully stifled competition.
(30) The Supreme Court's transition from applying the scope of the patent test to the Rule of Reason test will impact future courts' decisions when analyzing reverse payment settlements, since courts will have to weigh multiple Rule of Reason factors, including the anticompetitive effects, redeeming qualities, market power, and likely offsetting legal considerations, such as patent and antitrust law. (31)
Modern antitrust law is firmly grounded in neoclassical economics, which is in turn centered on price theory.
Although strictly limited to bringing out the precise implication from Hayek's statements partly shown, we may think about the Robinson-Patman Act enacted in the New Deal era, if we have knowledge of the antitrust law. The Robinson-Patman Act, which prohibits price discrimination, sought to remedy two types of harm to competition.