Antitrust Acts

Antitrust Acts

1. See: Sherman Act.

2. See: Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2007, Retractable sued BD for violations of antitrust acts, false advertising, product disparagement, tortious interference, unfair competition, and other matters.
I don't believe the antitrust acts were passed with this in mind."
The compromise measure worked out by the House and Senate extended the moratorium on the Sherman and Clayton antitrust acts to June 30, 1948, and provided specifically that after that date, the acts would be applicable to the insurance business to the extent that the business was not regulated by state law Named the McCarran-Ferguson Act, the compromise primarily applied to gathering data for setting rates, and its limited exclusions from antitrust laws did not include boycotting, coercing or intimidating.
law, when considering the competitive effects of a proposed bank merger or acquisition, the Board is required to apply the competitive standards contained in the Sherman and Clayton antitrust acts. Under these standards, the Board may not approve a proposal that would result in a monopoly or that may substantially lessen competition or tend to create a monopoly in a particular market.
In considering the competitive effects of a proposed bank acquisition, the Board is required to apply the same competitive standards contained in the Sherman and Clayton antitrust acts. The Bank Holding Company (BHC) Act and the Bank Merger Act do contain a special provision, used primarily in troubled-bank cases, that permits the Board to balance public benefits from proposed mergers against potential adverse competitive effects.
First, according to Healy, all credit managers should be familiar with the tenants of the various antitrust acts, including the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Clayton Act and the Robinson-Patman Act.
Both practices are questionable if not downright illegal under the Clayton and the Sherman Antitrust acts.
Hytera's original complaint, filed on December 4, 2017, alleged that Motorola Solutions is engaging in anticompetitive practices that are unlawful under the federal Sherman and Clayton Antitrust Acts and under the unfair competition laws of California and Florida.
When considering the competitive effects of a proposed bank acquisition, the Board is required to apply the competitive standards contained in the Sherman and Clayton Antitrust Acts.
The principal federal antitrust acts are the Sherman Act, (1) the Clayton Act, (2) the Federal Trade Commission Act, (3) the Robinson-Patman Act, (4) and the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act.
In considering the competitive effects of a proposed bank acquisition, the Board is required to apply the same competitive standards contained in the Sherman and Clayton Antitrust Acts. The Bank Holding Company (BHC) Act and the Bank Merger Act do contain a special provision, applicable primarily in troubled-bank cases, that permits the Board to balance public benefits from proposed mergers against potential adverse competitive effects.
In considering the competitive effects of a proposed bank acquisition, the Board is required to apply the same competitive standards as those contained in the Sherman and Clayton Antitrust acts. The Bank Holding Company (BHC) Act and the Bank Merger Act do contain a special provision, applicable primarily in troubled bank cases, that permits the Board to balance public benefits from proposed mergers against potential adverse competitive effects.