Slavery

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Related to Antislavery movement: abolitionism

Slavery

The practice in which one person owns another person, or at least that person's labor. In either case, the owner does not compensate the slave for his/her work. Slavery is one of the world's oldest institutions. In the modern world, it is considered one of the most egregious human rights violations. It is illegal in nearly every country, but still exists. In the present, it is strongly associated with sexual trafficking and forced domestic servants.
References in periodicals archive ?
39) Julie Roy Jeffrey, The Great Silent Army of Abolitionism: Ordinary Women in the Antislavery Movement (Chapel Hill: North Carolina, 1998), 64.
The first women's rights convention, held in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848, was convened by women who had met each other in the antislavery movement.
But she succeeds admirably at fleshing out what may be a vague impression of the roles of rank and file women in the antislavery movement.
Now, quick cut back to England, where the antislavery movement is becoming better organized under the largely Quaker Committee of Six and the peripatetic Thomas Clarkson, reinforced by such figures as William Wilberforce, Josiah Wedgwood, and the author Olaudah Equiano, a sailor, adventurer, and former slave of uncertain origins--and himself the subject of a recent well-received biography by Vincent Carretta.
The involvement of women in the antislavery movement began an insatiable appetite for further political involvement for causes like suffrage, anti-lynching laws, and temperance.
Emerson recognized in his address that American culture was at a moment of crucial transition, under great challenge to sustain the costly but vital momentum for democratic social progress that was the potential legacy of the antislavery movement and the Civil War.
The result is a book that presents a picture of an antislavery movement that was fought on various fronts and emphasized interracial cooperation, self-defense, and necessary violence to defeat slavery.
The emotional and thematic core of the book, and approximately half of its contents, describe the attempts by northern mobs and southern legislatures to silence the antislavery movement.
Later, tourists will explore the Smith family estate in Peterboro--a safe haven for slaves on their way to Canada and a financial and intellectual center of the antislavery movement.
Fueled in part by the ideology of the antislavery movement, courts and commentators in the nineteenth century gradually insisted that freedom of contract enjoyed constitutional protection.
The literature on the antislavery movement in antebellum America is vast.
This includes the antislavery movement, women's suffrage, birth control, modern feminism, industrial unionism, civil rights, and the movement against the Vietnam War.