Anti-Globalization

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Anti-Globalization

A movement that opposes free trade, free movement of capital, and other policies intended to facilitate international business. Various types of people oppose globalization. Labor unions in developed countries may oppose it because it represents a threat to traditional, industrial jobs. Other factions on the left believe globalization favors the wealthy at the expense of the poor and working class.
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The questioner was asked to repeat the question, which he did, emphasizing the antifree trade and antiglobalization feelings of developed countries.
So far as anti-Vedanta mobilization is concerned, the agentive notion of tribals is made possible in the act of submission to a global antiglobalization discourse so that the latter can legitimate itself as a rescue narrative.
On the contrary, an antiglobalization movement supporting common property and suspicious of private and state property was one of the most widespread and 'recomposing' movements in history with a capacity for instantaneous communication and coordination across continents, dramatically expressing itself in 'global days of action' that brought millions of people into the streets of the world's cities simultaneously to protest the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization and their neoliberal globalization policies.
Certainly, activists using textiles--stretching from Penelope in the Odyssey through the Peace Camp at Greenham Common and more recent actions designed to stage "knit-ins'" amid the clouds of tear gas at antiglobalization protests--have pointedly made use of such stereotypes, using crafting to unsettle mainstream media coverage that tends to dismiss protest as the pastime of violent hooligans.
Many people in the West would assume that the people with an Islamic background would be anti-West, anti-EU, antiglobalization, but in Turkey that's not the case.
Globalization and antiglobalization, can only be understood in conjunction with each other.
de Lint and Hall only jump onto the scene much later with the native land occupations through the 1990s and the antiglobalization movement at the turn of the millennium.
This approach is illustrated through an examination of an encounter that took place during an antiglobalization rally in Washington, D.
Diaz: Don't Clean Up This Blood" Daniele Vicari ("The Past is a Foreign Land") will helm this reconstruction of the headline-making, bloody, Italian police brutality during the 2001 Genoa G-8 Summit in which dozens of international antiglobalization protesters sleeping in the city's Diaz school were assaulted by cops in riot gear.
Sweeney emphasized securing rights for workers everywhere and led large antiglobalization protests against the World Trade Organization in Seattle and the hemispheric trade talks in Miami.
He was disturbed by the police's recent reaction to an antiglobalization rally in London, when one bystander was killed after being shoulder-charged by a heavily suited officer.
Although globalization is grounded upon economic activities, it has significant political and social ramifications: clearly, it cannot exist without political preconditions; conversely, it may be derailed by political "backlash" as symbolized by the impact of antiglobalization protests.