Antidumping Duty

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Antidumping Duty

In international commerce, a tariff placed on an import that is unusually low-priced. Dumping is the act of exporting a good to a foreign country to capitalize on the price difference. Dumping can result in a handsome profit for the exporter, but it can also damage the importing country's local economy. Thus, many countries attempt to counteract the practice by implementing anti-dumping duties.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dar to slap antidumping duties on imported rice as rice farmers have lost at least P40 billion due to the 23-percent decline in palay prices.
market below the cost of production or below prices in their home markets are subject to antidumping duties. Companies that receive unfair subsidies from their governments, such as grants, loans, equity infusions, tax breaks, or production inputs, are subject to countervailing duties aimed at directly countering those subsidies.
In a research note to investors, Wedbush analyst Seth Basham says antidumping duties over 200% could "tip the scales" back in favor of U.S.
Industry watchers here view that the 41.1 percent antidumping duties on wire rods would offset any competitive gains Korean exports may have with the exemption of additional tariffs.
International law allows for antidumping duties to remedy such behavior when it threatens or causes material injury to producers in the export market.
The Department of Trade and Industry has slapped provisional antidumping duties as high as 87 percent on float glass imports from China as these were found to be causing serious injury to Philippine glass manufacturers.
Antidumping duties are intended to offset the amount by which a product is sold at less than fair value, or "dumped," in the United States.
ABSTRACT: Antidumping duties are a trade remedy often utilized against producers in the United States' own bilateral trading partners.
The antidumping duties, which are primarily used against imports from countries such as China and developing countries, stem from a complaint filed to the Commission by the European ethanol producer trade association known as ePure.
WASHINGTON--Hardwood plywood imported from China came a step closer to facing antidumping duties following a unanimous vote by the U.S.
The European Commission has appealed the World Trade Organisation (WTO) ruling against the EU concerning antidumping duties applied to certain Chinese iron and steel fasteners, denounced by Beijing, the WTO announced on 25 March.
Pressure from other quarters is mounting as Washington piles up antidumping duties on other Chinese products, whether it's $2.6 billion worth of steel pipe or, also last week, $33 million of ribbon used for wrapping gifts.