Antitrust Law

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Antitrust Law

Any law opposing trusts, monopolies, and other organizations or practices deemed to be anti-competitive. Antitrust laws especially refer to laws forbidding price-fixing contracts, price discrimination, and tying. Proponents of antitrust laws believe they increase competition, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Commission a de-centralized system for the anti-trust legislation will affect the market in a positive way as a result of better protection against this type of practices.
The panel discussed future anti-trust legislation in Europe and its possible impact on the Americans.
At press time, GRAB was reviewing federal anti-trust legislation that could impact manufacturers of nonwoven materials.
Bachvarova is in charge of the "agriculture and food" portfolio in the working group on anti-trust legislation in Bulgaria which is scheduled to hold its first sitting on Tuesday.
They call on national and EU competition authorities to tackle abuse of dominant position in this sector but also in distribution and trade, and to apply EU anti-trust legislation strictly.
According to critics, Ezz has exploited his position in the government in order to monopolize the local steel market by obstructing promised anti-trust legislation.
The anti-trust legislation was approved despite heavy lobbying from the executives of the affected companies.
The trend was so pronounced as to provoke major public concern that led, in turn, to the adoption of serious anti-trust legislation which forced companies to be more responsible to share-holders and to evolve more transparent styles of accounting, ownership, and management.35 Firms remained large, of course, but they developed more distinctly corporate forms of governance and organization.
Like all guidelines, these are not legally binding but will serve to give an idea of how the European Commission will assess these types of agreements with respect to EU anti-trust legislation. This is a new situation for shipping firms, which until now were exempted from EU competition rules and allowed to fix prices and coordinate transport capacity (organised in what are referred to as liner 'conferences').