Anti-Globalization

(redirected from Anti-globalists)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Anti-globalists: Anti-Globalization Movement

Anti-Globalization

A movement that opposes free trade, free movement of capital, and other policies intended to facilitate international business. Various types of people oppose globalization. Labor unions in developed countries may oppose it because it represents a threat to traditional, industrial jobs. Other factions on the left believe globalization favors the wealthy at the expense of the poor and working class.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Anti-globalists' longing for cultural isolationism, it must be admitted, has rendered the economic dimension of anti-globalism strikingly toothless.
Republicans on Capitol Hill want the UN to stop attacking Israel, leftist anti-globalists usually like pressure on Israel but hate the IMF's heavy hand, and European populists focus their anger at Brussels and often lack clear views on how global institutions should be reformed.
The anti-globalists said throwing eggs and tomatoes at the Hummer will help draw attention to their cause.
(Yet economic liberalization is not a miracle cure, as the cases of Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus make clear.) "For all the anti-globalists' cries on their behalf," Emmott adds, "few of the world's poorer countries show signs of wanting to retreat from liberalism: Their question, rather, is whether to extend it rapidly or gradually, and whether they have the domestic governmental institutions to cope with it."
The court's decision has also been hailed by other activists, such as anti-globalists who were concerned about their own freedom of expression.
The argument of targets and appropriate instruments is cleverly threaded throughout his response to anti-globalists. The idea that you cannot kill two birds with one stone is emphasized.
Anti-globalists' opposition to globalization is based on analysis that has confirmed a deep gap between the rich and the poor.
Yesterday students, anti-racists, environmentalists, anti-globalists and gay rights activists all made common cause against the far-right, mustering hundreds of thousands for a rally staged in almost carnival mood - again without trouble.
In search of interesting coverage, the massive press contingent turned the spotlight towards the few so-called anti-globalists, and to Cuban President Fidel Castro, who staged his own little diplomatic show.
And, in the aftermath of the Quebec City protests, and with the G-8 summit planned in June in Kananaskis, Alberta, can anyone doubt that these new measures are aimed at least as much against anti-globalists and anti-capitalists as they are against foreign terrorists?
There are the 'anti-globalists' who fear globalisation and seek therefore powerful interventions aimed at taming it.
What seems to be slowly emerging in the public debate is a more nuanced understanding of globalisation issues -- one that recognises the claims of both hyperglobalists and anti-globalists, and distinguishes both from the transformationalists.