Antitrust Law

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Related to Anti-Trust Laws: Monopoly, Clayton Act, Sherman Antitrust Act

Antitrust Law

Any law opposing trusts, monopolies, and other organizations or practices deemed to be anti-competitive. Antitrust laws especially refer to laws forbidding price-fixing contracts, price discrimination, and tying. Proponents of antitrust laws believe they increase competition, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bill Gates: Furious EU is interfering when Microsoft is already subject to anti-trust laws in America
The company has denied any violation of anti-trust laws, claiming that its competitors are trying to prevent it from improving its products.
If the purpose of the anti-trust laws was to smash big business, then why has the American economy become much more centralized since their passage?
chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, called for the investigation by the Federal Trade Commission, which enforces the federal anti-trust laws.
You can be assured that if we conclude that the venture violates the anti-trust laws, we will take appropriate action," Klein wrote in a letter to state officials.
Though congress has no real voice in the decision of whether the merger violates American anti-trust laws, which must be made by the Justice Department, the hearings are expected to have some influence on the outcome.
Congressmen with farming constituencies are pressing for tougher enforcement of anti-trust laws, and if necessary new legislation, limiting pork processors' right to own fattening pigs.
Freiband also recommended that activists explore legal action to block mergers, noting that federal anti-trust laws may apply in some cases.
On April 27, 1999, Oneida filed suit against Libbey, claiming the loyalty provision of Libbey's customer rebate program violated several anti-trust laws.
The Japanese Fair Trade Commission (JFTC) has ruled that the domestic subsidiary of Microsoft Corp broke Japan's anti-trust laws by promoting software in a way that disadvantaged rival's products.
Pro-choice advocates wonder why the government hasn't treated some of the mergers as violations of anti-trust laws.
Not according to one Colorado lawmaker who wants to skirt anti-trust laws so hospitals can create cooperative partnerships.