Anti-Monopoly Policy

(redirected from Anti-Monopoly Policies)

Anti-Monopoly Policy

Any law or policy intended to oppose monopolies and other anti-competitive organizations or practices. Anti-monopoly policies are intended to regulate the market share an individual company can have in order to enforce competition. Proponents of anti-monopoly policies believe the added competition benefits the consumer, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
If that swing from 2016 could be replicated nationally, Kelloway observes, it "would all but wipe out the current incarnation of the Republican Party." Over the longer haul, anti-monopoly policies could restore the freedom of small and midsize cities around the country to compete for business, economic growth, and residents--and take away the GOP's geographic advantage for good.
Greater rapidity might actually elicit larger political support than a more gradualist transition strategy if it were accompanied by strong measures to spread the costs of transition (for example, anti-monopoly policies, tight tax discipline on the nouveaux riche) and generous programs to compensate those hardest hit by inflation, unemployment, and relocation.
In 2014, two law professors little known to the general public, Zephyr Teachout and Tim Wu, ran a quixotic primary challenge to New York's powerful governor, Andrew Cuomo, and his hand-picked candidate for lieutenant governor, Kathy Hochul, in part by stressing anti-monopoly policies. Despite little money and overwhelming odds, Teachout and Wu surprisingly garnered more than a third of the vote.
This tradition, which dates to the time of Thomas Jefferson, found expression in anti-monopoly policies designed to protect Americans not just as consumers, but also as citizens and producers, from domination by the powerful.
It was also axiomatic that anti-monopoly policies were essential to keeping both Big Business and Big Government in check.
Full browser ?