Anti-Monopoly Policy

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Anti-Monopoly Policy

Any law or policy intended to oppose monopolies and other anti-competitive organizations or practices. Anti-monopoly policies are intended to regulate the market share an individual company can have in order to enforce competition. Proponents of anti-monopoly policies believe the added competition benefits the consumer, while opponents, notably Ayn Rand, argue that they encourage economic inefficiency and punish success. See also: Sherman Act, Clayton Act.
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In 2014, two law professors little known to the general public, Zephyr Teachout and Tim Wu, ran a quixotic primary challenge to New York's powerful governor, Andrew Cuomo, and his hand-picked candidate for lieutenant governor, Kathy Hochul, in part by stressing anti-monopoly policies.
Greater rapidity might actually elicit larger political support than a more gradualist transition strategy if it were accompanied by strong measures to spread the costs of transition (for example, anti-monopoly policies, tight tax discipline on the nouveaux riche) and generous programs to compensate those hardest hit by inflation, unemployment, and relocation.
It was also axiomatic that anti-monopoly policies were essential to keeping both Big Business and Big Government in check.
Yes, governments can and have pursued ill-considered anti-monopoly policies.
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