Anti-Globalization

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Anti-Globalization

A movement that opposes free trade, free movement of capital, and other policies intended to facilitate international business. Various types of people oppose globalization. Labor unions in developed countries may oppose it because it represents a threat to traditional, industrial jobs. Other factions on the left believe globalization favors the wealthy at the expense of the poor and working class.
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In short, transnational American Studies provided the opportunity to salvage a "globalization from below" (to use a phrase popular with the anti-globalization movement), and to favorably contrast it to both nationalism and economic globalization (or "globalization from above").
The anti-globalization movements across the world that gather thousands of protesters are known to everybody.
Challenges to mainstream economic thinking in Virginia also emerged in the relatively small anti-globalization movement that came in the wake of NAFTA and the growing global importance of the World Trade Organization (WTO).
To fight this vision of world order, a new anti-globalization movement emerged, breaking into the headlines at the World Trade Organization meeting in the legendary Battle of Seattle of 1999.
What is so striking about the so-called anti-globalization movement is that it is challenging the process that is not only supported by the only superpower, but also the rich classes around the world.
One can only hope that Thayer will write a sequel, as she is very well positioned to offer important insights on subsequent developments such as the Workers' Party (PT) coming to power, the Lula Presidency, the eruption of the anti-globalization movement and the appearance of the World Social Forum in Brazil, the emergence of new transnational and anti-neoliberal feminisms like the World March of Women, and the effects of these on the feminisms discussed here and the politics of their transnational relations.
At the same time I became more aware of the anti-globalization movement, and it appeared to me that it was addressing the structural causes of ill health: .
Although this latest globalization started with great optimism and enormous expectations after the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, by the end of the 1990s there was a worldwide anti-globalization movement with great power to mobilize 'global consciousness and solidarities'.
In these rallies one always met the syndicalists, anarchists, the militant left-wing socialists, communists, Trotskyites, members of the anti-globalization movement, the pacifists along with a few lost idealists and, lest we forget, the other minorities who passionately identified with the plight and despair of the Palestinians.
The anti-globalization movement was recently theorized as a "movement of movements," a concept which has now been widely adopted.
The increasingly popular anti-globalization movement has been most recently characterized by its disorganization and lack of cohesiveness.
The anti-globalization movement was born as a reaction to these excesses and inequalities.