Anglophone

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Anglophone

A person, company, or country for which English is the primary language. Because of the importance of America and the UK in the global economy, English is one of the most common languages in international commerce.
References in periodicals archive ?
The volume, which esoterically ranges across a broad range of topics, played a role in introducing the thought of the once less prominent Lacan to Anglophonic audiences.
Each of those more recent works served to furnish the Anglophonic world with more direct access to Kuyper and offered some constructive criticism.
Reading his passing criticism of the work of certain Anglophonic luminaries (Clive Brown, William Rothstein, and Richard Taruskin, among others) who have entered this complex fray (pp.
Here notions possess the denotation of active elements interpreting sentient life in motion and not the Anglophonic connotation of 'ideas' as mentalistic constructs which presuppose a cogitating I substance.
32) As Frank Felsenstein notes with respect to this phenomenon, Anglophonic folk and oral traditions were susceptible to corruption in urban spaces as a consequence of migration from the country to the metropolis.
The chronicle of three soldiers' experiences differ widely, from the blue-collar Italian American subdued by military order to the Anglophonic artistic officer who runs AWOL.
Unfortunately, there has never been in China acceptance of the peculiarly Anglophonic right to criticize one's rulers.
But the consensus opinion, at least in the English-speaking world where Yiddish is used for flavor, rather than for everyday conversation, is that anyone more Anglophonic than the Satmar Rebbe might want to think twice about using it.
An overview of the social processes whereby late medieval Italian culture in the person of Dante came to play such a significant role in the work of Eliot, one of the twentieth century's greatest Anglophonic poets, will provide grist for a most fascinating story regarding the effects that travel to Italy had on several key literary and academic personalities during the nineteenth century, accounting for a cultural shift that then took place in England and subsequently America as profound in its impact on literature as the eighteenth-century shift in European attitudes toward the Middle East that resulted in that literary and artistic revolution called Orientalism.
Ardila's own essay, which opens the volume, provides a concise and accurate account of the wide array of Anglophonic adaptations of Cervantes' themes and stylistic innovations and glosses key trends in reception by English readers.
It took a long time for Anglophonic social psychology to recognize the social world.
Leaves of Grass combined and developed these tendencies into a full-blown strategy that announced itself in an opening proclamation to the Anglophonic globe that, while America did not "repel the past," that past was no longer binding.