Anglophone

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Anglophone

A person, company, or country for which English is the primary language. Because of the importance of America and the UK in the global economy, English is one of the most common languages in international commerce.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quebec has maintained a strong regional and cultural identity despite being under Anglophonic control for the past 250 years.
Anglophonic readers of The Genius of Language need shed nothing but illusions about the sufficiency of English.
This history will draw largely on examples relating to Britain, but the arguments are equally applicable to emerging liberal sensibilities across the Anglophonic world.
Austere like her prose but hip like her topics, Sontag was my first inkling of an avant-garde, my initial medium to an edgy alternative to the Anglophonic modernism--Yeats, Eliot, Pound, Joyce--that had become the established stuff of high literature.
Others (ocher; ochre, for one) address alleged confusion between American and British spellings, but most readers will either already understand the differences presented, or rely on their word processing programs to help them avoid Anglophonic mistakes.
Okeley and other crafters and publishers of the emerging Anglophonic genre knew that they had to both affirm and surpass cultural stereotypes and take their readers to places they had never seen and to which they could never go.
More significantly, however, he, like other downtown detractors, probably regarded the Jewish Times-Westmount-based, Anglophonic, and Anglophilic-as nothing more than an uptown society rag.
Bayou music scholar and practitioner Ann Savoy gathered a diverse assembly of Anglophonic folk types (Linda Ronstadt, John Fogerty, Richard Thompson, David Johansen, Maria McKee .
In fact, Badran's very abridged adaptation of Mudhakkirati affixes Sha'rawi in the Anglophonic readership as the "first" Arab woman to "take off" the veil (1986, 5, 7).
of Lincoln) present 23 papers exploring examples and issues of literary journalism in global media (albeit with an admitted Anglophonic slant).
A 13-year-old has more in common with a 12-year-old than a 19-year-old, but because the suffix "teen" occurs in both numbers, our Anglophonic society consigns 13 and 19 to the same category.
This volume investigates a corpus of 30 narrative and dramatic Anglophonic texts in which the motif of scientist as God is both central and explicitly verbalized.