Andrew Carnegie


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Andrew Carnegie

An American early industrialist. He began working at a factory as a boy and ascended the corporate ladder until he founded Carnegie Steel Company, which later became U.S. Steel. Believed by many to be one of the richest men in history, he became a philanthropist in later life and gave away most of his money. Critics claim he was an opponent of organized labor who paid his employees poorly under harsh working conditions. His supporters contend he lived the American dream, rising from poverty to wealth through hard work and dedication. He lived from 1835 to 1919. See also: Robber Baron.
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Non-fiction Picture Book / Andrew Carnegie / Libraries / Philanthropy
The shortlist of three books for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction 2018 are: The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner, by Daniel Ellsberg; David Grann's Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI; and You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, by Sherman Alexie.
Andrew Carnegie had visited Kilmarnock around that time to lay a foundation stone so there was a possibility it could have been true.
Andrew Carnegie, Carnegie Libraries, and Carnegie "Negro Libraries"
Roughly 800 of Andrew Carnegie's original library buildings "are still in use as public libraries." Adaptive reuse has transformed 350 others into other cultural entities and office buildings, etc.
1919: | Philanthropic American industrialist Andrew Carnegie died.
In the early 1900s, self-made steel tycoon Andrew Carnegie challenged Napoleon Hill, then a small-town newspaper reporter, to interview the most successful people of the day and condense their wisdom into a formula for success.
Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music.
Carnegie, PA, April 23, 2014 --(PR.com)-- Hometown chamber ensemble The Matt Murchison Mutiny will bring its eclectic and enlivening brand of “music without boundaries” to the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall for a live performance Monday, April 28.
Quite apart from politics, literature and the arts, those luminaries include (among others): John Logie Baird, Alexander Graham Bell, Andrew Carnegie, James Dewar, John Boyd Dunlop, Alexander Fleming, James Gregory, Douglas Haig, David Hume, David Livingstone, John McAdam, Robert McAlpine, Charles Macintosh, Adam Smith, Robert Thomson, Robert Watson-Watt and James Watt.
ANDREW Carnegie was a giant amongst men, He had a vision even way back then.