Amortized Loan

Amortized Loan

A loan with the same payment each pay period. In an amortized loan, different amounts go to principal and interest each month. This allows the lender to receive the full amount of interest while also keeping periodic payments equal. See also: Self-Amortizing loan.
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Under the agreement, the amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility mature in two years and the term loan is a fully amortized loan payable monthly over three years.
There is also an optional ability to roll the loan into a 15 year fully amortized loan.
The 30 year amortized loan is secured by 101,062 s/f building, which includes mixed use retail and office space.
For example, HUD offers borrowers a 40-year fully amortized loan for new construction, major expansion, or rehab, and a 35-year term and amortization for refinancing.
We believe a fully amortized loan product is a good alternative as it provides a reasonable monthly payment, a chance to build some equity, and when market conditions are most favorable, they can refinance before the due date.
The fully amortized loan was underwritten using HUD's Section 232 pursuant to Section 223(f) funding program.
By sending a standardized e-mail message to borrowers encouraging them to view statements and notices (such as Amortized Loan Statement, Change Notice Analysis, or T&I Disclosure) on the financial institution's eStatus Web site, lenders are able to reduce the amount of incoming call volume, while maintaining high customer service levels.
At this time, interest rates on HUD loans remain below six percent with HUD offering borrowers a 40-year fully amortized loan for new construction, major expansion or rehab, and a 35-year term amortization for refinancing.
23% and the current total amortized loan balance was 1.
Whereas HUD offers borrowers a 40-year fully amortized loan for new construction, major expansion or rehab, and a 35-year term and amortization for refinanced transactions, conventional loans most typically offer 10 year loans that are amortized over periods of 20 to 25 years with renewal options that may be negotiated later.
Whereas HUD offers borrowers a 40-year fully amortized loan for new construction, major-expansion or rehab, and a 35-year term and amortization for refinanced transactions, conventional loans most typically offer 10-year loans that are amortized over periods of 20 to 25 years with renewal options that may be negotiated later.