Amicus Curiae

(redirected from Amicus Briefs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

Amicus Curiae

Latin for "friend of the court." A person who is not a party to a case but offers expert or other relevant information on a point of law in order to help the judge or jury make a decision. An amicus curiae may offer testimony (provided it is unsolicited by either party in the case) or write a brief or legal treatise on the matter at hand. The court has full discretion whether or not to accept the statement of an amicus curiae.
References in periodicals archive ?
For information on the IADC's amicus brief program and to view past briefs, please visit the Amicus Briefs page on the IADC website.
Market Synergy and supporters of DOL's rule are duking it out as they await a decision by the Kansas judge on whether he will consider the amicus briefs.
CalCPA's amicus brief argues that the Court of Appeal should affirm the trial court's opinion, and that proof of reasonable reliance is necessary for at least three reasons:
The March 9-filed amicus brief, authored by Professor Laurence Tribe of Harvard University, supports review of the case by the nation's highest court.
There are two ways to prevent repetition among amicus briefs.
At the outset, it should be noted that the purpose and form of amicus briefs have not been stable across time or across the different jurisdictions in which they appear.
The district courts of appeal mention amicus briefs in their opinions as well.
Its apogee was likely reached in the University of Michigan admission cases involving the role of racial preference (18) in which more than 100 amicus briefs were filed.
The full process for filing an amicus brief can take a significant amount of time.
Perhaps unsurprisingly, judges have not hesitated at expressing their opinions concerning the value of amicus briefs.
Because the requirements of the standing board policies regarding the filing of amicus briefs by sections can be waived by the Board, the unanimous approval by the Board did not constitute an ultra vires action.