test

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Test

The event of a price movement that approaches a support level or a resistance level established earlier by the market. A test is passed if prices do not go below the support or resistance level, and the test is failed if prices go on to new lows or highs.

test

The attempt by a stock price or a stock market average to break through a support level or a resistance level. For example, a stock that has declined to $20 on several occasions without moving lower may be expected to test this support level once again. Failing to fall below $20 one more time would be considered a successful test of the support level and a bullish sign for the stock.
References in periodicals archive ?
More than one assay should be conducted and due to Ames test limitations it should not be a standalone study in the tier.
In Ames test the mutant strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used.
Rat fed with milk cultured with Enterococcus faecium IS-27526 significantly decreased fecal as well as urinary mutagenicity of rats as measured by the Ames test (Tables 3 and 4).
The original Ames test was in the public domain, but UC Berkeley has a patent pending for Ames II.
As an example, Lundy notes, the Tripartite agreement relative to testing biocompatibility of medical devices now includes the Ames test for the mutagenicity effect, to verify whether a particular plastic material might change the shape of a cell or how it replicates.
A number of tests can be used; they include: Ames test (bacterial reverse mutation assay), mammalian cell chromosomal aberration test, mammalian cell gene mutation test (MLA mouse lymphoma assay), and Micronucleus test.
It includes practical approaches on how to perform the tests and to interpret the results and describes a stepwise testing strategy, starting with the Ames test.
The routine use by the chemical industry of the Ames test and related short-term tests for mutagenesis as part of new product development has undoubtedly prevented the release of carcinogenic chemicals into the environment.
What's more, Petrakis says, secretion from "8 percent or so of the women came up positive in the Ames test," a bacterial assay to identify possible carcinogens.
An example of a service witnessing significant demand is its new microAmes test which saves pharmaceutical companies time and money by fully predicting the GLP regulatory Ames test using milligram quantities.
That the predictive value of the Ames test was overstated (Frickel 2004) only served to stimulate the development of short-term, in vitro tests for carcinogenicity.