Almsgiving


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Almsgiving

The act or practice of giving money to the poor or to an organization dedicated to religious or social issues. Almsgiving is an important part of many religions, which generally encourage or commend taking care of the poor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most important reason is that giving money directly, if done correctly, makes possible an encounter between the giver and receiver of alms that organized almsgiving does not always allow for.
Part 1 stresses how, in the thought of early Judaism and Christianity, almsgiving was understood as an exchange of trust with God.
These times are particularly appropriate for spiritual exercises, penitential liturgies and pilgrimages as signs of penance, voluntary self-denial such as fasting and almsgiving, and fraternal sharing (charitable and missionary works)" (CCC 1438).
Both poets agree that almsgiving, a pillar, is most fulfilling when giving of oneself.
His engaging book begins with a discussion of Christian almsgiving in early Russia, where beggars could be found among pilgrims, and the destitute might find refuge or even a home in churches, monasteries, or elite households.
Vang Vieng has a reputation for psychedelic pizzas and rowdy nightlife, and even the almsgiving to Buddhist monks has been commercialized.
Lent is also traditionally a time for almsgiving. I imagine this was originally penitential but can also be a way of talking stock of what is important to us.
It comes under 'saddaka', which is charity or almsgiving, donation, offering, there are many names for it.
The sermons engage with their audience, encourage rather than chastise: sin is contextualized as a threat to the coherence and identity of community, and penance is emphasized via personal and active sorrow rather than almsgiving. Bailey skilfully contrasts this localized and relatively unstudied 'service model' of religious leadership with the more widely-studied 'authoritarian', ecclesiastical leadership as expressed by influential contemporaries and sermonizers such as Caesarius, bishop of Arles, who arguably chose to build community through a paternal vision of obedience and imposition.
More evidence and success appears in royal and aristocratic patronage of churches and monasteries through land grants, almsgiving, and endowments by kings and commoners seeking to secure their place in the heavenly kingdom.
The gospel reading, from the Sermon on the Mount, gives us Jesus' instructions to his followers regarding fasting and prayer, with a preview on almsgiving.
The volume begins with an introduction to the foundation of Islam, embodied in the Five Pillars, Iman or Faith, Salat or Prayer, Sawn or Fasting, Zakat or Almsgiving, and Hajj or Pilgrimage.