alligator

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Alligator

An option spread with unusually large commissions for the involved broker(s). In an alligator, the commissions are so large that the potential profit from the spread is not worth the expense. In such a situation, the investor holding the spread is said to be "eaten alive."

alligator

An option spread in which the commissions are so large a part of any potential profit that the investor gets eaten alive. Obviously, alligator spreads are of greater benefit to the broker than to the investor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Without the stones, the air would cause the alligators to float.
The strategy has worked "very well" with wild alligators the South, Bob said, but the Humboldt Park gator was probably raised in captivity.
Until now Chinese alligators population affected by varied factors but mostly included habitat fragmentation and degradation, shooting, natural disasters, geographic separation, low productivity, and pollution.
The photo of the alligator with the knife in its head had been circulating on social media, and neighbours who saw it wanted to help.
Male alligators can grow up to 16 feet in length, but gators that are 14 feet long are rare, according to the (https://georgiawildlife.com/sites/default/files/wrd/pdf/fact-sheets/2016_alligator.pdf) Georgia Wildlife alligator fact sheet .
6,261 NUMBER OF ALLIGATORS HUNTED AND KILLED IN 2017
While assessing the damage that Hurricane Harvey had caused to his property, Brian Foster spotted a nine-foot-long alligator under his dining table, news channel KTRK reported.
Good alligator hunting later this summer takes preparation and application--this month.
(21) Feeding can cause alligators to lose their fear of people, an important evolutionary trait that benefits both people and animal.
A heavyweight alligator spotted in Florida, USA, has raised eyebrows on social media.
While it is an unwritten rule among Florida residents that small children are kept away from ponds and lakes, many visitors are not aware of the danger from the state's one million alligators.
They are almost invisible before striking from shallow water and will feed on just about anything, including fish, frogs, birds, turtles, snakes, wild hogs, humans and other alligators.