Alien corporation

Alien corporation

A company incorporated under the laws of a foreign country regardless of where the company conducts its operations.

Alien Corporation

A corporation organized and registered according to the laws of another country but with operations in the domestic country. The alien corporation may or may not also have operations in the country in which it is registered. In order to attain tax advantages, some countries allow corporations to register and not maintain operations. See also: Multinational corporation, Tax haven.
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an alien corporation outside the territory of the United States that had never developed substantial connections within the country[] could make any claim to the protection of the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment."); cf.
(80) Finally, the dissent understood that the plurality's rule would allow alien corporations to use common commercial arrangements, like appointing a distributor, to avoid minimum contacts with (and therefore personal jurisdiction in) any state.
A new trailer of the movie explains the reason why Earth is in danger from an alien corporation.
The planet was seeded by an alien corporation that is run by a royal house, and a member of the royalty has the right to harvest Earth for his own profit.
* An alien corporation that satisfies the conditions, if, under any provision of the IRC, that corporation is treated as a domestic corporation under IRC section 7701, and it has effectively connected income pursuant to Tax Law section 208(2)(9)(ii).
* An alien corporation that satisfies the conditions if, under any provision of the IRC, that corporation is treated as a domestic corporation under IRC section 7701, and it has effectively connected income pursuant to Tax Law section 208(2)(9)(ii)
* An alien corporation operating in New York had to include foreign-source income on its franchise tax return, even though such income was not included on its Federal return.
An ALJ ruled that an alien corporation operating in the state must include foreign-source income on its franchise tax return, even though such income was not included on its Federal return.(52)
possession) or an alien corporation (i.e., incorporated under the laws of a foreign country).
However, the amendment does not affect non-FSC alien corporations that continue to be exempt from combined reporting.
"International law is the normative expression of the international political system"(1) and as a result, international law governs the relations between states.(2) Within this international system, however, states are free to regulate their nationals, as well as the relations between their nationals and other states.(3) A rational corollary to this is the right of a state to regulate a multinational corporation (MNC) incorporated within its territory.(4) The steady growth in the overseas operations of MNCs, through their foreign subsidiaries, collaborations with alien corporations, and joint ventures, has complicated this traditional view of jurisdiction.(5)
Accountability under international law also poses serious problems when alien corporations are thrown into the mix.