Air Marshal


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Air Marshal

An undercover law enforcement agent who boards a flight as a normal passenger to prevent a hijacking or other crime, should one occur. The air marshal is tasked with ensuring air travel, both for business and pleasure, occurs smoothly and safely. An air marshal is also called a sky marshal.
References in periodicals archive ?
I remembered my friend Al Gionni's comment on the firearms standard: a monkey could pass the firearms qualification for the Federal Air Marshal Service.
The anonymous texter is on the plane and knows who Bill is, though air marshals travel undercover.
In his illustrious career spanning 35 years so far, Air Marshal Gill has had the distinction of commanding various frontline bases.
"With Air Marshal, we're pleased to offer high-grade intrusion detection and prevention without the cost and complexity of traditional solutions."
ACP Bhisham Singh of the Delhi Police special cell, which was investigating the case, said he was not aware of the involvement of the US air marshal.
Because the number of air marshals is less than the number of daily flights, FAMS's operational approach is to assign air marshals to selected flights it deems high risk--such as the nonstop, long-distance flights targeted on September 11, 2001.
Secret Service, Air Marshals, pilots and other U.S.
The training programme was part of an aviation security agreement between the two countries that will also allow US air marshals to work undercover on flights operated by US carriers into China and vice versa.
There are potentially serious consequences to being enrolled on a federal "watch list." Thus it is, to say the least, unsettling to know that "watch lists" compiled by the federal air marshals service are built on the quota system--meaning that the names of thousands of innocent U.S.
Northwest Airlines DC-10-30 en route from Minneapolis to Mumbai via Amsterdam yesterday abruptly returned to Schiphol Airport shortly after departure, at which point 12 passengers were arrested by US air marshals for "suspicious" behavior.
Stranger still, says Andrew Thomas, an aviation security expert at the University of Akron, "If the air marshals were properly trained, and could recognize threats, and the threat was so great, why didn't they shoot him on the plane" rather than letting Alpizar run through the aisle and on to the jetway, supposedly with a bomb in his bag.
A PASSENGER who claimed to have a bomb in a carry-on bag was shot and killed by a federal air marshal yesterday on a jetway to an American Airlines plane that had arrived in Miami from Colombia, officials said.