Aggregate Limit

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Aggregate Limit

The maximum amount that an insurance policy will provide over a given period of time or over the life of the policy. For example, if an insurance company has agreed to pay all of a person's medical bills up to $100,000 and the person incurs $135,000 in services, the policyholder must pay $35,000 out of pocket. Some supplemental insurance policies provide coverage over the aggregate limit. See also: Stop loss insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Large single obligor limits (in excess of EUR10 million) represented about 31% of CSR's aggregate limits at end 1H17.
Enhancements to the DairyProtector and FeedLotGuard programs include AgriCover for Property (including extended replacement costs); AgriCover for Liability (including aggregate limits per location); and Chemical Drift and Environmental Pollution Coverage.
The aggregate limits of the underlying and excess policies are $1 million and $10 million, respectively.
Designed in cooperation with BDAE Expat Consultancy and reinsured by Allianz, MaxMedical combines comprehensive benefits with worldwide geographical coverage, extensive network of service providers and the highest aggregate limits.
The new Data Security endorsement provides four optional coverages, each with separate and varying aggregate limits, sub-limits, and deductibles, allowing agents to tailor coverage to their customers specified needs.
I would overrule Buckley and subject the aggregate limits in BCRA (The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002) to strict scrutiny, which they would surely fail," wrote Thomas in a concurring opinion.
The court said the aggregate limits violated the First Amendment of the U.
Roberts said in his opinion that the aggregate limits violated the First Amendment of the U.
Recently invalidated aggregate limits on federal campaign contributions capped the total amount that one can give to all candidates, parties, or political action committees (PACs).
Next, in reading the policy as it did, the trial court rendered the portion of the declarations page pertaining to aggregate limits superfluous, referring to it as "irrelevant, " instead of attempting to read the declarations in conjunction with endorsement no.
The Federal Election Commission says the aggregate limits are necessary to prevent evasion of the restrictions on individual contributions.
The Court seemed skeptical of the current aggregate limits on contributions to candidates but more wary of lifting aggregate limits on political parties or revisiting 1976's Buckley v.

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