Agency Shop


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Related to Agency Shop: Modified Union Shop

Agency Shop

A company with a large number of employees represented by a union but in which workers are not required to join the union. That is, the agency shop has both union and non-union workers. The non-union workers are not required to pay union dues but must pay what is called an agency fee to cover the costs of collective bargaining. See also: Open shop, Closed shop, Right to work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Agency shop clauses for public employees were unconstitutional, period.
(7) From the union's perspective, these agreements, known as "agency shops," are justifiable on the grounds that nonunion employees should not be permitted to free ride on the union's statutorily mandated, employment-related bargaining, which benefits both union and nonunion employees alike.
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 banned the closed shop but left it to the state's discretion whether to also prohibit the union shop and agency shop. That partial right-to-work victory was followed by the 1950 Railway Labor Act amendments, which established the union shop on American railroads.
More radical reforms include moving from defined-benefit to defined-contribution pensions, eliminating "agency shops," and mandating that dues check-off fees be used only for bargaining, not political purposes.
of unions to fully enforce agency shop provisions against employees who
In any event, more than a dozen years ago, we visited the issue of whether teacher union agency shop fees were "ungodly."2 In that earlier stage, the appropriate accommodation between the union's organizational interest and the religious objector's individual interest was not clearly settled.
Compromise positions may be either a union shop that applies to new hires only or an "agency shop," where employees who decline to be members still owe the union a representation fee.
As evidence, they have trumpeted the union's demand that all new employees join the union or, if they choose not to join, be required to pay union dues, creating what is known as an agency shop. "I don't believe there are any issues of substance or consequence, outside of the union demand [for an agency shop], that cannot be resolved.
Membership stands at 95 percent of potential without the help of fair share or agency shop provisions.
Further, they review case law on chargeable agency shop fees.
The only way the union can ensure that even one of the employees will join the union, or pay the union for the costs incurred in representing the employees, is if it can convince the employer to agree to one of the two types of union security clauses that the NLRA allows: union shop agreements (clauses in collective bargaining agreements which require employees to join the union representing them) and agency shop agreements (clauses in collective bargaining agreements which require employees who do not join the union to pay an "agency fee" to cover certain union costs).
The concept of an agency shop that required all workers within a bargaining unit to pay the equivalent of union dues, whether or not they were members of the union, was first developed at the Ford Motor Company plant in Ontario, Canada, in 1946.
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