Age Discrimination in Employment Act


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Age Discrimination in Employment Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1967, that forbids discrimination against persons over the age of 40 in the hiring or firing of, and the distribution of benefits to, employees. The Act was deemed necessary because some employers were unlikely to hire otherwise qualified applicants because they were closer to retirement and therefore less likely to stay with the company. It provides for reinstatement and back pay for employees against whom companies have discriminated.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) protects individuals age 40 and over from employment discrimination because of their age, including discrimination in discharge decisions.
The law textbook introduces the major issues that dominate the law of employment discrimination and explains case interpretation guiding individual claims of intentional discrimination, class claims of disparate treatment and impact, affirmative action, sex discrimination under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII, procedures under Title VII, remedies, Section 1981, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and disability rights.
Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) of 1967 and the Older Worker's Benefit Protection Act protect individuals of companies of 20 or more employees who are 40 years of age or older.
This, legal experts said may be in violation of the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.
Summary: The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) turns 50 this year and it is still learning new tricks.
Answer: The federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) applies only to employers that have "twenty or more employees for each working day in each of twenty or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year." However, most states have their own laws governing discrimination, so you need to be familiar with the laws of the state(s) in which you operate.
In general, claims of discrimination against older employees allege either disparate treatment or disparate impact under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 2005.
I write in response to the Labor and Employment Law piece in the February 2010 issue ("The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967: Issues Litigated at the Supreme Court Level").
Laying off a worker based on age has been illegal since the 1967 passage of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which protects workers 40 years and older from employment discrimination based on age.
Age Discrimination in Employment Act The federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), as amended, provides that it is unlawful for an employer:
Discriminatory employment tests and selection procedures are prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, all of which are enforced by the EEOC.