Cash Flow After Taxes

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Cash Flow After Taxes

In accounting, a measure of a company's cash flow after all taxes are paid. It is calculated by taking the net income and adding back in the value of all non-cash expenses, notably amortization and depreciation. Publicly-traded companies with a high cash flow after taxes are in a better position to distribute cash dividends than those with a low cash flow after taxes. In addition to this, it is also used as a measure of general performance and financial health.
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(2015) admit, firms may instead discount net after-tax cash flows at an opportunity cost of capital that "reflects the average risk of the resulting aggregate" (p.
Annual after-tax cash flows of between $52 and $144 million, totaling $909 million over the life of the mine was also included in the study.
Reason being, any new policy that results in lower after-tax cash flows (regardless of entity form) will be highly likely to result in declining stock/unit prices, resulting in a higher cost of capital, which will lead to lower infrastructure investment.
A surge in the city's high-end rental stock has kept asking rents low but Klatt said he believes that could change as reduced after-tax cash flows convince more tenants to choose rents over mortgages.
tax reform enables improved visibility into after-tax cash flows and access to ex-U.S.
We can also look at your plans in terms of pretax and after-tax cash flows, which may provide an even clearer picture of your retirement finances.
At the highest personal income tax rate in Ontario (49.53%), an investor would need to earn regular interest income at a rate of 9.5% per annum to realize the same after-tax cash flows.
We will need to determine annual after-tax cash flows generated by the new product.
Appropriate for both undergraduate and graduate courses, this textbook introduces the process of forecasting after-tax cash flows from real estate investment proposals, credit instruments for borrowing money, and the tax implications of owning property.
Comparisons based on the Net Present Value (NPV) of after-tax cash flows, efficient deferral of taxes, optimization of tax benefits and effective use of balance sheet management can provide a cost effective solution required to meet the increasing demands in remaining competitive in the marketplace.
Financial managers have traditionally appraised new investment projects by discounting the after-tax cash flows to present value at an entity's weighted-average cost of capital (WACC).
One is the present value method, which compares the present values of the after-tax cash flows of the two alternatives.