killer bee

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Killer Bee

An investment banker who helps publicly-traded companies take periodic or continual measures to discourage unwanted or hostile takeovers. One example of an antitakeover measure in which a killer bee might assist is the macaroni defense, in which the company issues a large number of bonds with the proviso that they must be redeemed at a high price if the company is taken over.

killer bee

An individual or organization that assists a firm in repelling a takeover attempt, especially by devising defensive strategies.
References in periodicals archive ?
The assumption is when somebody calls us, they do have the Africanized bees,'' said Jack Hazelrigg, vector control district manager.
However, the defensive behavior of africanized bees remains highly distinguished.
Scientists feared that dangerous swarms of Africanized bees would compete with native bees.
In Costa Rica, the presence of Africanized bees was first reported in early 1983, in San Isidro de El General (11, 12).
The new breed of bees developed a bad reputation for their hot tempers - if a hive is disturbed, Africanized bees will attack and swarm more viciously than other honeybees.
The most frequent pollen species in both European and Africanized bee pollen load samples in both sites (with a mean percentage frequency of [greater than or equal to] 2%) were C.
In the early 1970s the Africanized bee was beginning to become known to the public, primarily through quite vivid stories of the havoc it could create.
An Africanized bee works herself to death in two-thirds of the time it takes the gentle Italian bees that most beekeepers raise.
Africanized bees are famous for chasing their victims over long distances.
22 PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON B, the Africanized bee "has helped to bring D.
This Africanized bee, which has been migrating from South America since the 1950s after the hybrid bees were bred, looks just like a honeybee, according to the Texas A&M University agricultural program.