Adventure


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Related to Adventure: Adventure park, Adventure capitalist

Adventure

Any activity that involves risk. Almost any investment, business opportunity, and even many jobs involve adventure of one kind or another. The willingness to undertake an adventure is a necessary component to the function of capitalism.
References in classic literature ?
We were to do all the important things precisely as they are done every evening at his own home, and so I am in a puzzle to know how it was such an adventure to David.
That is a pretty story, and the end shows how grateful a bird can be; but if we tell it we must also tell the whole adventure of the lagoon, which would of course be telling two adventures rather than just one.
In the first place, you needn't sneer at adventure when you are living it yourself; and you were certainly living it when I found you first, down with fever on a lonely plantation with a couple of hundred wild cannibals thirsting for your life.
But with undiminished ardour he picked up every glove cast before him into the merry lists of adventure.
'Why don't you, cher monsieur, give us the drama of virtue?' 'Because, chere madame, the high privilege of virtue is precisely to avoid drama.' The adventures of the honest lady?
"It is easy to see," replied Don Quixote, "that thou art not used to this business of adventures; those are giants; and if thou art afraid, away with thee out of this and betake thyself to prayer while I engage them in fierce and unequal combat."
A Faithful Record of Their Amazing Adventures in an Underground World; and How with the Aid of Their Friends Zeb Hugson, Eureka the Kitten, and Jim the Cab-Horse, They Finally Reached the Wonderful Land of Oz
Only a narrow potato patch separated him from the adventure. Five minutes passed before he felt sure enough of himself to call to her.
It may seem that he was plunged very abruptly into this long adventure. But from certain passages (suppressed here because mixed up with irrelevant matter) it appears clearly that at the time of the meeting in the cafe, Mills had already gathered, in various quarters, a definite view of the eager youth who had been introduced to him in that ultra-legitimist salon.
But the more he thought upon the matter the less positive he was as to the verity of the seeming adventure through which he had passed, yet where the real had ceased and the unreal commenced he was quite unable to determine.
Defoe got the idea of his story from the adventures of a Scots sailor named Alexander Selkirk.
And when they heard of his adventures they marveled that he would jeopard his person so alone.