Advance Directive

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Advance Directive

A legal document expressing a person's medical wishes in the event of his/her mental or physical incapacity. An advance directive is made while the director is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. An advance directive may state whether or not the director wishes to be placed on life support or to receive a particular treatment. It may or may not assign another party, usually a family member, to make these decisions as they come up. It is important to note that in this situation, an advance directive is not a power of attorney and neither allows the other party access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges him/her to pay for any treatment. See also: Proxy directive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recalling that Terri Schiavo had no advance health care directive in place at the time of her tragic incapacitation, then, what issues did her sad saga raise about illness, incapacitation, and impending death that most or all advance directives fail to address?
Surveys have demonstrated that physicians discuss advance health care directives and specific issues, such as do-not-resuscitate orders, with the minority of their patients.
An educational program for nurses can help address knowledge gaps related to advance health care directives (AHCDs) thus helping to ensure that patients' wishes for care at the end of life are known and respected, reports a paper in the October/December Journal of Christian Nursing, official journal of the Nurses Christian Fellowship.
2; Newfoundland and Labrador's Advance Health Care Directives Act, S.
This book/CD-ROM package includes forms and instructions for unlimited, limited, general, durable, financial, and health care powers of attorney and revocation, plus advance health care directives and living wills.
Mary's, will provide a primer on advance health care directives, including documents such as Living Wills and Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) Orders.
In their recent debate in The Journal of Family Practice about routine discussion of advance health care directives, Drs Saultz and Rodriguez agree on one significant point: physicians need to improve their communication with patients regarding this important issue.

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