Advance Directive


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Related to Advance Directive: Durable power of attorney

Advance Directive

A legal document expressing a person's medical wishes in the event of his/her mental or physical incapacity. An advance directive is made while the director is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. An advance directive may state whether or not the director wishes to be placed on life support or to receive a particular treatment. It may or may not assign another party, usually a family member, to make these decisions as they come up. It is important to note that in this situation, an advance directive is not a power of attorney and neither allows the other party access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges him/her to pay for any treatment. See also: Proxy directive.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of discussions about advance directives on patients' satisfaction with primary care.
Advance directives are still helpful in patient care.
Issuing an advance directive is so personal that can only be exercised by the right-holder, i.
In Part 1 last July we explored key historical developments that have led to our current situation concerning end of life processes and care including: our aging population, increased expectations for life saving and life extending medical care, the evolution and expansion of hospice services, and the legal recognition of patients' right to decide about their end of life care directly or through advance directives.
Five Wishes is legal in most states and it is a combination living will and advance directive.
Over 300 parents with children with chronic diseases seen at outpatient clinics were asked about their knowledge of advance directives, their preferences on discussing them, and their child's past and current health status.
The first requirement in making a living will or advance directive is to have the courage to accept one's medical condition, and make this known to the family.
It is possible such end of life medical interventions would have been different had these family members' choices been supported by an advance directive.
And the only way to ensure that outcome is through the completion of advance directives.
More work is needed to understand how members of the healthcare team in ICU should integrate the patient's message from an advance directive in ongoing dialogue about whether the use of life support technologies are wanted in care at the end of life.

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