Administrative Law

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Administrative Law

A body of law created by government agencies. It consists of rules, regulations, and decisions made by an agency rather than a law passed by Congress or Parliament. That is, administrative law is not legislation, but it has the force of law. Administrative law became more common starting in the 20th century as government programs worldwide became both more common and more complex.
References in periodicals archive ?
42) In these double degrees, the main focus is not the comparison of administrative law but students are exposed to two legal systems and are trained to develop their mental maps and think as if they were "natives" of that system for a range of legal issues, including constitutional law, administrative law, the relationships between the EU and domestic laws.
In Belgium, comparative administrative law needs to be put in its wider context of comparative law teaching.
First, in contrast to France, Belgian administrative law is often taught from a comparative law perspective.
These options include at least five out of the following options relevant to comparative administrative law purposes: federal systems, instruments of public authorities, legal protection against administration, law of foreigners, education law, and environmental and energy law.
Finally, an overview of legal education in comparative administrative law needs to look at institutional research and PhD research.
Regular reports are issued, including discussions of administrative law topics: for instance, open access to public documents (in 2014), breaches of procedural requirements and the "bestuurlijke lus" (administrative loop) in administrative justice from a comparative perspective (in 2013), and procedural guarantees in a welfare state (in 2012).

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