Assistive Technology

(redirected from Adaptive equipment)
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Assistive Technology

A computer program or any other technology used to help physically impaired persons. One example of assistive technology is a computer program that reads newspapers aloud to blind persons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: As part of its Adapted Sports & Recreation Program, Helen Hayes Hospital provides the kayaks, specialized seating, and other adaptive equipment that allows participants to paddle on a local lake or the Hudson River.
* the need for library staff who were disability aware and trained in both the use of the adaptive equipment provided and the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.
Be sure to contact your DMV about any adaptive equipment you install.
The cost of personnel rises, along with the costs of materials, adaptive equipment and technology, and training for staff.
Young Children as Explorers: Interactive Learning Experiences addresses learning standards established by the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics, National Research Council, and National Council for the Social Studies; provides ideas for adapting activities for children with disabilities; contains suggestions and activities for family involvement; and includes resources for adaptive equipment, software, and supplies.
* Adaptive equipment or the modification of equipment.
She suggests using reachers and other adaptive equipment to avoid flexion.
Because so much reading is required, adaptive equipment may be helpful to promote ability.
Young (1991) suggests that work simplification, adaptive equipment, and energy conservation may assist the individual in maintaining better health.
If this quick screen raises concerns, the patient can be referred to an occupational therapist, who may recommend adaptive equipment or vehicular modifications.
Also, if VR has approved funding for adaptive equipment or an assistant such as a note-taker to meet the vocational goal, it may be possible to use those funds to provide the same service while abroad.
Assistive technology, which can help people with disabilities function more effectively at home, at work, and in the community, can include computers, adaptive equipment, wheelchairs, bathroom modifications, and medical or corrective services.
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