Actuarial Analysis


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Related to Actuarial Analysis: Actuarial Risk

Actuarial Analysis

An evaluation of the risk of loss to an investment done by an actuary. Actuaries use a variety of statistical models and other mathematical methods to conduct actuarial analysis. See also: Actuarial risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The BPD provides three methods to compare datasets: (1) visual comparison of histograms; (2) actuarial analysis; and (3) regression analysis.
ICI said: 'Initial indications from the actuary are that such an increase might add some pounds 100m to pounds 250m to the deficit, but further detailed actuarial analysis is required.'
ICI said: "Initial indications from the actuary are that such an increase might add some pounds 100m to pounds 250m to the deficit, but further detailed actuarial analysis is required."
The Baker decision reaffirms that taxpayers entering retirement communities may continue to deduct the medical portion of their entrance and monthly care fees; no costly actuarial analysis is needed.
4 Conduct actuarial analysis to determine the impact on the annual required contribution
In fact, the fundamental basis for the "science" of insurance-related calculations is called "actuarial analysis," a subject that has evolved from simple mathematical analysis concerning the financial consequences of uncertainty in cash flows and life contingencies to considerations of all aspects of financial analysis under uncertainty in a business context and quantitative analysis of the (future and contingent/state-dependent) effect of contingencies upon the financial conditions of a firm.
Each service is integrated with the other through shared information systems, instant data exchanges, actuarial analysis, predictive modeling and proactive referral protocols.
The latest actuarial analysis by Deloitte & Touche for FY 2002 projects an excess above the 2 percent reserve requirement of $34.124 billion between now and FY 2009.
Although the cost impact sometimes can be mitigated by arcane techniques such as demonstrating the comparability of benefits through an actuarial analysis or offsetting the other employer's contributions against the amount otherwise due under the PC's plan, such approaches can be cumbersome and subject to some uncertainty.
Expanded mental health parity will cost employers a 1% increase in health plan costs, or an additional $1.32 per member per month, according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers actuarial analysis of the Mental Health Equitable Treatment Act of 2001 (S.
An actuarial analysis prepared for FHCA by Aon Worldwide Actuarial Solutions, Columbia, Md., showed that loss costs for the long term care industry have increased at an annual rate of 20 percent in most states during the past five years, and 37 percent in Florida.