Joint

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Joint

Describing anything in which two or more persons hold equal rights and responsibilities. For example, every account holder may use the funds in a joint account (though not always independently from the other holders), and each owner is equally liable for a jointly-held property.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent biomechanical studies have proved beyond doubt that reconstruction of acromioclavicular joint using tendon graft is more biological and the resultant repair tissue is desirable in terms of strength and kinematics.
The most common mechanism of acromioclavicular joint (AC) injury is direct trauma that usually happens by falling onto the shoulder, especially when the shoulder is adducted.
Evaluation and treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries.
The diagnostic workup includes radiographs to rule out other pathology, such as acromioclavicular joint arthritis or glenohumeral joint arthritis, which usually presents as loss of both active and passive range of motion, as well as MRI.
The man with the acromioclavicular joint dysfunction demonstrated a marked improvement after two treatments.
Pain between 60 and 120 degrees of abduction ("the painful arc") is associated with subacromial impingement, whereas pain after 120 degrees is an indication of acromioclavicular joint origin.
Patients younger than 40 years of age, history may include usually glenohumeral instability and acromioclavicular joint disease and patients older than 40 years of age, history may include glenohumeral impingement and glenohumeral joint degenerative disease.
Patients with synovial pain were randomized to one of three treatments: (1) intra-articular/intrabursal corticosteroid injection (40 mg triamcinolone acetonide plus 9 mL lidocaine, 1 to 3 injections at randomization and repeated at 2 weeks) using a standard approach (INJ); (2) "classic" physiotherapy including exercise, massage, and "physical applications" twice a week (PT); and (3) manipulation and mobilization of the spine, shoulder, upper ribs, acromioclavicular joint, and glenohumeral joint once a week (MANIP).
An examination of os acromiale ties in nicely with a look at acromioclavicular joint injuries.
The acromioclavicular joint is a relatively subcutaneous diarthrodial joint lined with hyaline cartilage and an interposed intra-articular meniscal structure.
As this Neer type III distal clavicle fracture (2) nonunion was functionally equivalent to a persistent acromioclavicular joint separation, stabilization of the coracoclavicular interval was performed, utilizing a 4.