Acquiree

(redirected from Acquired Company)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Acquiree

A firm that is being acquired.

Acquiree

A company that is the object of a takeover attempt. That is, another company is buying the acquiree's shares with the intent of obtaining a majority stake. This may occur with or without the authorization of the acquiree's board of directors. An acquiring company identifies potential acquirees based on a variety of factors, including share price and growth potential; in the event of a hostile takeover, the acquirer may buy up to 5% of the acquiree without publicly disclosing its intentions.
References in periodicals archive ?
This acquired company will remain a separate organisation and offer its own parts and services under its own brand name, Alfa Laval added.
The departure of owners and top executives of an acquired company may be particularly relevant in cases in which the knowledge contained within the acquired company is a key asset.
It is important that we develop a realistic business plan to use the acquired company to grow earnings and make the investment accretive to shareholders.
After Henkel purchased the assets and liabilities of metalworking chemicals maker Amchem, it was sued for damages resulting from pre-sale exposure to metallic chemicals manufactured by the acquired company.
However, it is difficult to retain all acquired company top executives, as most are lost within a few years of the acquisition (Krug & Hegarty, 1997; Walsh, 1988, 1989; Walsh & Ellwood, 1991).
That is, it is the difference between the fair value of the acquired company (the amount paid for the company) and the amounts assigned to the acquired company's assets and liabilities during the purchase price allocation process.
At Saint-Gobain, "success" means we achieve synergy, and therefore get the financial results we expect from the acquisition; and the best people in the acquired company decide to stay.
Other rules apply when the loss relates to a lower-tier subsidiary of the acquired company.
Help reduce any "culture shock" by identifying key company or country cultural characteristics of the acquired company and the acquiring company to assist in communications.
A study conducted by Mercer Consulting Group, indicated that the problem with recent acquisitions seems to have much less to do with faulty selection -- or with paying too much for an acquired company -- than with what went on after the deal was sealed.