Accounting Principles Board


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Accounting Principles Board

A committee of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants that advised on and set standards for financial record keeping. It was dissolved in 1973 and replaced by the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

Accounting Principles Board (APB)

A group of accountants appointed by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants to determine accounting principles for financial record keeping. The APB was terminated in 1973 with the founding of the Financial Accounting Standards Board.
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Accounting Principles Board (APB) (1962), "Accounting for the 'Investment Credit'," Opinion No.
Accounting Principles Board, 1971, Accounting Changes, Accounting Principles Board Opinion No.
Spacek was years ahead of his time; his call for such entities as an "Accounting Court" bore fruit in the establishment of the Accounting Principles Board.
The Accounting Principles Board (APB) averaged only two Opinions per year during its existence (1958-1973), but the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has generated 147 Statements, not counting Interpretations, and the SEC has issued a plethora of regulatory pronouncements.
141, Business Combinations, addresses financial accounting and reporting for business combinations and supercedes Accounting Principles Board (APB) Opinion 16 rules on purchase and pooling accounting.
The Accounting Principles Board issued Opinion #20 in 1971 to provide guidance and maintain consistent treatment when firms--and accountants--deal with accounting changes.
Investments in common stock accounted for under the equity method for financial reporting purposes in accordance with Accounting Principles Board Opinion No.
Such accounting treatment is rare and reserved for gains or losses stemming from events or transactions "that are distinguished by the unusual nature and by the infrequency of the occurrence," according to rules of the Accounting Principles Board, a part-time predecessor of FASB (APB Opinion No.
It would be difficult to turn back to principles-based standards (the Accounting Principles Board issued several standards in the 1970s that were principles-based), since companies, auditors, and analysts have become accustomed to rules-based standards.
An NQSO program enjoys favorable accounting treatment under Accounting Principles Board (APB) Opinion No.
It is important to realize that the FASB was created in response to specific criticisms of the Accounting Principles Board (APB).