Absolutist


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Absolutist

A person who believes all power should belong to the state. According to absolutism, every corporation, religious organization, or other institution must give way to the state. Absolutism comes from the period in European history before and during the early development of capitalism during which monarchs attempted to centralize. See also: Fascism.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cultural absolutist critics of universal human rights look for a world that no longer exists, if it ever did: a world of community, of integrative membership of the individual in the group, and of a wholeness and unity with nature.
In other words, he believes that Sklar's idea of absolute acceleration without absolute spacetime, according to which acceleration is regarded as a primitive property or brute fact about physical bodies, may turn out to be the best option for the absolutist (see Sklar (|1974~, p.
Indeed, Lawrence's language conveys a powerful narrative of newly recognized civil liberties and cultural tolerance, adopting an absolutist tone that rejects alternative outcomes.
The end result for the crown was the augmentation of royal revenues and the juridical empowerment of the absolutist state.
In the last third of the book, Cook attempts to undercut the anthropological argument for relativism--as well as the absolutist argument for a naive realism--by arguing that both positions share a mistaken understanding of morality and of moral reasoning.
To begin with, the absolutist vision of a united socialist republic (a vision held by small minorities in the North and the South) does not allow very much room for political discussions; therefore, only complete military success is deemed possible.
Absolutist rhetoric can also distort an ongoing constitutional debate.
These images are backed by the whole force field of absolutist monarchy--yet as images they are not especially impressive but are merely routine and forgettable exercises in court propaganda.
After the introduction there are seven essays: the nature of Henry VIII's vision of a Catholic church without a Pope and the use of the word, 'Catholic'; the ways in which those loyal to the old faith came to terms with the new settlement in religion; how Catholics came to terms with Elizabeth I and the nature of their relationship; the 'martyr books' devoted to Catholic martyrs between 1582 and 1602; Ben Jonson's Sejanus in which he gave the audience 'a strikingly absolutist and Catholic version of the "civic republican tradition"'; the political arguments in the Catholic view of James I's oath of allegiance; and, finally, the role and importance of Catholic education.
145] There is some evidence that Felton flirted with republicanism, but it is difficult to see class struggle here (Felton himself was from an impoverished gentry family) and a causal leap to see his action as part of an emerging "alliance of the parliamentary classes with the small-producing extra-parliamentary laboring classes" who shared a "common interest in resisting the absolutist class-state embodied in the person of .
But in a world dominated by health messages for every aspect of human life and the emergence of the internet, are these professionals becoming too absolutist in their advice?
And if Yaroslavsky subscribes to such an absolutist view about the separation of church and state, why was he, in his capacity as an elected leader, pleading last week to local pastors that they cross the divide between government and religion and aid police in combating gang violence?