Monarchy

(redirected from Absolute monarchy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Monarchy

A system of government headed by a hereditary figure such as a king or queen. There are two basic types of monarchies. In an absolute monarchy, the monarch theoretically has complete control as an autocrat, though in practice other officials have varying degrees of control as well. In a constitutional monarchy, the monarch shares power with an elected chamber or other elected leaders and, in extreme cases, has little actual power.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, despite the book's title, he does not adequately explore how the dixieme affected the relationship between the absolute monarchy and France's privileged elites.
The crisis is also leading to a radical revision of the place of the monarchy in Thailand's history since the overthrow of the absolute monarchy in 1932.
The measures did not include political reforms in the absolute monarchy such as fresh municipal elections demanded by liberals or opposition groups.
Pincus demonstrates that the Glorious Revolution was intimately bound up with the grander politics of Europe, and that King James's attempt to copy the Catholic and absolute monarchy of France's King Louis XIV represented a triple threat to British interests.
Thai police called in army reinforcements early yesterday to rein in the protests, setting nerves on edge in a country that has seen 18 military coups since the end of absolute monarchy in 1932.
Farhan had used his blog to criticize corruption and call for political reform in Saudi Arabia, an absolute monarchy.
4 Where did a century of absolute monarchy come to an end with the country's first general election?
In his De Rege et Regis institutione libre III et Phillippum III Hispania Regem Catholicum (1599), Mariana at the same time advocated absolute monarchy and the overthrowing of tyrants.
Ford gives an important clarification of Ussher's abiding political philosophy, arguing for his unambiguous adherence to absolute monarchy.
18), arguing that all three, through their rich treatment of discourses on freedom and slavery, are apologists for absolute monarchy as incarnated in the figure of Louis XIV.
Kobkua Suwannathat-Pian's latest book is a detailed yet readable overview of Thailand's political evolution since the fall of the absolute monarchy in 1932.