Absolute Rate

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Absolute Rate

In a plain vanilla swap, the fixed interest rate. In a plain vanilla swap, the two legs of the swap are a fixed interest rate, say 3.5%, and a floating interest rate, say LIBOR + 0.5%, each calculated over some notional value. Each party pays the other at set intervals over the life of the swap. In this case, the absolute rate is 3.5% over the notional value.
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At five months, the absolute rates of high emotional exhaustion decreased by 19.5 percent in the intervention group and increased by 9.8 percent in the control group (difference, −29.3 percent; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], −34.0 to −24.6 percent); the absolute rates of overall burnout decreased and increased by 17.1 and 4.9 percent, respectively (difference, −22.0 percent; 95 percent CI, −25.2 to −18.7).
By the end of 2015, that figure declined modestly to 193%, with absolute rates of 19 versus 5.5 deaths per 100,000 delivery hospitalizations for black versus white women in 2006.
While certain rare harms appeared to be more common in women with silicone implants, absolute rates of these adverse outcomes were low.
On a larger scale, Key properties of the population such as the absolute rates are currently only poorly constrained.
They should focus on the absolute rates of stroke corresponding to risk prediction point scores and be alert to potential biases in studies reporting these rates.
The analysis should be done not on absolute rates but on normalized ones," the Minister underlined.
"We were extremely pleased with the outcome and firmly believe that fundamentals versus merely low absolute rates are now driving the market."
Dr Goldthorpe argues that absolute rates of social mobility are determined primarily by changes in the occupational and class structures.
This highlights the importance of choice between relative differences (difference in absolute rates) versus relative ratio (ratio of rates).
These provisional rates mentioned will be absolute rates with effect from April 1, 2011.
Studenski and her colleagues to calculate survival estimates for a broad range of gait speeds, and to calculate absolute rates and median years of survival.
Although the results indicate that measures of discounting of the different commodities at the first administration were predictive of rates of discounting 12 weeks later, it was not always the case that the absolute rates of discounting remained the same.