Absence Rate

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Absence Rate

The full-time employees who do not work full-time in a given week, expressed a percentage of total employees in a given company or industry. The absence rate does not consider whether a given absence is legitimate; it only observes that the employee is not at work. In general, the absence rate is higher in companies with more generous employee benefits. Companies seek to keep their absence rates to the lowest level possible.
References in periodicals archive ?
Women had higher absence rates than men in each age group, and women's lost worktime rates were also higher than men's in age groups younger than 55.
A spokesman for ABMU Health Board said the boar had been "working hard" to reduce sickness absence rates.
Across the UK, the public sector had higher sickness absence rates than the private sector, with those working for the NHS taking the most time off.
e ls re he dy A trial of early treatment for 13,000 Spanish workers reduced absence rates by 39 per cent, the foundation said.
Driving down absence rates can play a key role in getting our economy here in the North Wales and across the country growing.
There were lower absence rates in London and the South East - 5.
The survey shows a correlation between companies with strategies to train managers in sickness absence and with tougher absence targets, with falling absence rates.
All NHS organisations know it is critical to drive down sickness absence rates in order to improve efficiency and the quality of services, and are working closely with their boards and staff representatives to tackle the problem.
EEF's 2009 survey of sickness absence trends in manufacturing companies showed a clear link between investment in training managers and reduced short and long term absence rates, as well as improved employee welfare.
EEF's 2008 survey of sickness absence trends in manufacturing companies showed a clear link between investment in training managers and reduced short and long term absence rates, as well as improved employee welfare.
If absence rates in councils were brought down, many millions of pounds of lost time could be saved, and taxpayers would enjoy better local services.
The CBI said its study showed that the gulf between absence rates in the public and private sectors grew to a record level, with public sector workers taking an average of nine days off sick compared with 5.