ASCII

(redirected from ASCII text)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to ASCII text: ASCII text file

ASCII

American Standard Code for Information Exchange. A code that represents as a binary number each of the 128 letters, numbers, punctuation marks and other characters used in English. This was developed in the 1960s for telegraphs and is used in computing.

ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange)

a system for coding individual numbers, letters and punctuation marks which is widely used in COMPUTERS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resulting ASCII text does not resemble the original document.
In addition to supporting specific accounting and tax packages, such modules can translate accounting data to ASCII text, spreadsheet data and a .DBF database format.
Since Prodigy e-mail includes a procedure for adding a file to a message, we could continue to prepare our copy on Telecommuter (or any word processor which can store a file in ASCII text) and add it to a message to the TBO group.
For users of Quicken, Lotus 1-2-3 (or other spreadsheets), Managing Your Money, Dollars and Sense or most ASCII text files, Turbo Tax offers an import option which allows data to be imported into the program without having to re-key information.
Some also can convert their ASCII text files into "soft" files that may be transmitted to other types of computers via a modem.
Vendor must capable of converting formatted, fix-length ASCII text data files into finished invoices that are mail-ready.
The software can also integrate peak areas, smooth data, take derivatives, enhance data resolution, edit and append data, re scale graphs, and store data in ASCII text format for use in other software packages.
The 416-page book is available in ASCII text, online, or in paperback for a cost of $34.95.
With PDF, articles appear as they were published in the actual periodical, allowing for an enhanced graphical representation of those charts, equations, and graphs that are difficult to represent in ASCII text. In addition, the company says version 3.1 will be year-2000-compliant.
For example, Savage, Hugo, and Newell (1991) have reported that some of their potential subscribers or readers do not have ready access to terminals or lack institutional support for network access; Bailey (1992) points out the limitations of ASCII text files for the distribution of electronic journals and suggests that no existing software tools can do everything needed for a fully successful implementation of a scholarly journal in electronic form.
The formats include bibliographic citation only, citations with abstracts, full ASCII text, full ASCII text with the reproduction of the figures, and, best of all, page-image format.