Aid to Families with Dependent Children

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Related to AFDC: Food stamps

Aid to Families with Dependent Children

A former social program in the United States that provided financial aid to low-income persons with children or other dependents. Aid to Families with Dependent Children is what most people in the U.S. called "welfare." Critics claimed the system was abused easily and created a culture of dependency. Proponents argued the program assisted the people who needed it most. It was replaced by Temporary Aid to Needy Families in 1996. See also: Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the small effects on mean or overall labor force participation, it should be remembered that our measures are identifying the effect on the labor supply of only about 35% of our sample (actual AFDC participants).
For AFDC beneficiaries, however, these small cost effects are more significant because average AFDC adult expenditures are $158 per month, and average expenditures for AFDC children are $57 per month.
This paper distinguishes between two specific types of income payments, AFDC and child support and alimony payments.
The data for the analysis of recidivism of among AFDC and TANF recipients were assembled from various sources: the Georgia Department of Labor, the Georgia Department of Human Resources, and the US Census Bureau.
The mean modal aid code for 49 percent of spells was AFDC.
AFDC provides income support to families based on need, income, and family size.
In a study in Wisconsin, Cancian and colleagues (1999) found that although the average earnings of recipients who left AFDC increased, the women's overall income dropped because welfare benefits fell more than their earnings increased.
Descriptive analyses were used to present differences by AFDC and non-AFDC status and by race on the independent variables and the five DSM-III-R disorders.
First, we not only follow other research in estimating the impact of AFDC policy changes on food stamp caseloads but also examine the impact of policies that are focused directly on food stamps.
However, some studies (Cheng, 1995; Hutchens, 1981; Plotnick, 1983) showed no significant effect of educational level on AFDC recipients' chances of leaving welfare (that is, exiting dependency or supplementation).
Because AFDC benefits were primarily available to single women with dependent children, the AFDC program decreased the gains from marriage and increased the gains from divorce.
Domestic violence, AFDC receipt and welfare reform in Massachusetts.