A. Philip Randolph


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A. Philip Randolph

A 20th-century American socialist and union organizer. He was particularly known for his role in the civil rights movement, protesting against discrimination against Black Americans in military contracts and other areas. In 1925, he organized the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first major effort to unionize the Pullman Company, which was then a major employer of African Americans. He lived from 1889 to 1979.
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Caption: 2017 Honorees: Principal David Fanning, Ashanti Albert, Akmaral Ulanova and Justin Leo Rivera of A. Philip Randolph Campus High School.
(32.) Eric Arnesen, "A. Philip Randolph: Emerging Socialist Radical," in Kersten & Lang, eds., Reframing Randolph, 62.
The A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum is the only museum in the nation that bears the name of A.
Dubois and Martin Luther King, A. Philip Randolph is one of the most important figures in the Black struggle for civil and human rights during the 20th century.
First, the author examines the religious ideas of a major African American leader, A. Philip Randolph, who was neither a clergyman nor involved in the internal affairs of a religious institution.
Pre-King black religious thinkers were also influenced by labor leader A. Philip Randolph, a secular socialist who sought to organize Pullman car porters in the 1920s and 1930s.
Lewis, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; A. Philip Randolph, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters; and James Farmer, Congress of Racial Equality), King was cut down by an assassin's bullet at the young age of 39 and Whitney Young drowned off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria, at the age of 50 in 1971.
A. Philip Randolph (1889-1979) was the determined, dedicated, and articulate president of this union who fought to improve the working conditions and pay for the Pullman Porters.
Because he was gay, Bayard Rustin had to defer credit for the 1963 March on Washington to A. Philip Randolph. Because he was gay, James Baldwin was attacked by a world-be black radical named Eldridge Cleaver.
Perry observes, Harrison has been "all but forgotten"; he is "one of the truly important, yet neglected, figures of early twentieth-century America," one who inspired such programmatically and stylistically diverse activists as A. Philip Randolph and Marcus Garvey.
Editor's note: A. Philip Randolph was also the Chair of the August 28, 1963 March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom.
That story also has been institutionalized in the A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum on Chicago's South Side.