Lumber

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Lumber

Wood cut in such a way as to be used for building. Lumber may be traded as a commodity and is especially important in the construction industry. Sustainable woodcutting has become a significant issue in the lumber industry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the last bit of 2-by-4 framework supports the corrugated roofing.
The market is full of devices promising to correct slicing, and most sell for many times the cost of a 2-by-4.
Using lag screws and corner braces, I then fixed two pairs of 7-inch-long 2-by-4 studs upright to the platform, leaving a 1-inch gap between the members of each pair.
Under lab-simulated storm conditions, SafeHarbor aluminum windows withstood the impact of a 9-pound 2-by-4 piece of lumber traveling at 35 miles per hour.
4 Cut 3 inches off of two 8-foot 2-by-4s, and double-check this with two blocks of 2-by-4 (see photo of final bench construction on Page 74).
Materials: Dog kennel; eleven 1-inch pipe clamps; 6 treated 6-foot, 2-by-4 boards; footing anchors; wire hog panels; nylon zip ties (or other fasteners); tubular foam-pipe insulation; weed barrier and landscape staples (optional); UV-treated, reinforced polyethylene sheeting; 8 treated 6-foot, 1-by-2 wood strips; screws and washers; spring clamps; planter hooks with machine bolts and nuts (optional); tables, irrigation, and shade cloth (optional).
It operates on a wood beam 2-by-4 positioned upright with a cast iron metal track on top of the 2-by-4.
Atop the decomposed granite, place pairs of flagstone slabs to act as guide stones; lay the flat side of a 2-by-4 on top of the slabs at the level of the string.
What's most refreshing is that Hillenburg's film actually has a sweet little message - the importance of believing in yourself - that is imparted in a way that doesn't feel like the filmmakers are hitting you over the head with a 2-by-4.
Each type comes in sizes ranging from 2-by-4 to 12-by-18 and fits into a display unit.
Soon after, I had the distinct displeasure of being whacked in the face by a fellow wielding a 2-by-4.
1, the Savings in Construction Act of 1996 would require metric units in the design of federal construction projects and the labeling of materials, but builders could continue to use existing materials (such as 2-by-4 boards).