Telecommunications Act of 1996

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Telecommunications Act of 1996

Legislation in the United States that deregulated telecommunications. It changed regulations for telephones, television broadcasts and cable in order to reduce barriers to entry and increase competition. It also regulated explicit material broadcast on television. See also: Communications Decency Act.
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* "The 1996 Telecommunications Act at Three Years: An Economic Evaluation of Its Implementation by the FCC," by Alfred E.
Interpreting the 1996 Telecommunications Act provides further support for a standard that undermines unlimited FCC merger review.
After years of focusing policy discussions on the pending reauthorization of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, the Information Technology and Communications (ITC) Steering Committee recently reviewed three timely, close-to-home technology issues that have an impact on municipalities.
Under the 1996 Telecommunications Act, cable rates are unregulated, except for the bare-bones basic package.
The passage of the 1996 Telecommunications Act (P.L.104-104) resulted in a major revision of the Communications Act of 1934 (47U.S.C.
As the article explains, while the makeup of Congress changed little with the elections, 2005 promises to be a year to watch, as many in the industry, and on Capitol Hill, are gearing up for a rewrite of the 1996 Telecommunications Act.
She focused on the impending rewrite of the 1996 Telecommunications Act.
The decision came in a series of cases involving the Missouri Municipal League, which argued that the 1996 Telecommunications Act says states may not prohibit any entity from offering local phone service.
The 1996 Telecommunications Act requires incumbent local phone companies (ILECs) to wholesale their networks to entrants (CLECs) at regulated rates.
In the wake of the 1996 Telecommunications Act, there was tremendous optimism about the eventual opening up of local telephony to competition.
"We welcome competition, but we lose more than $15 per line under rates determined when the 1996 Telecommunications Act was put in place," said Carrie Hightman, president, SBC Illinois.