Civil Rights Act of 1964

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Civil Rights Act of 1964

Legislation in the United States that prohibited racial discrimination in government, education and employment. It prohibited businesses from refusing to serve persons on the basis of race and it required judges to apply voter registration requests equally to all races. It invalidated state laws establishing racial segregation, and had the effect in some states of requiring school districts to bus students to other districts to conform to racial quotas. The Act is considered a landmark of the American civil rights movement.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

On November 27, 1963, newly sworn-in President Lyndon Johnson

called for the passage of a new civil rights bill, as a tribute to the late President John F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated only weeks earlier. The resulting bill was signed into law on July 7, 1964, with a stated purpose: “To enforce the constitutional right to vote, to confer jurisdiction upon the district courts of the United States to provide injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations, to authorize the Attorney General to institute suits to protect constitutional rights in public facilities and public education,to extend the Commission on Civil Rights,to prevent discrimination in federally assisted programs, to establish a Commission on Equal Employment Opportunity, and for other purposes.” It has come to be identified with halting discrimination in public accommodations—restaurants, hotels, and other public facilities.

References in periodicals archive ?
During his 1947 NAACP address, titled "Making Democracy Work," Morse talked about the right to vote, an ongoing battle for blacks that ultimately led to the historic 1965 federal Voting Rights Act, which prohibited racial discrimination in voting, signed by President Lyndon Johnson a year after the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
The legal question before the court was whether Elauf was required to ask for a religious accommodation in order for the company to be sued under the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which, among other things, bans employment discrimination based on religious beliefs and practices.
And if the 1964 Civil Rights Act can be read to imply that Rose has broken the law, then the law should be changed to conform with the only moral purpose of law, which is to protect people's rights to act on their judgment, to use their property as they see fit, and to contract with others voluntarily.
2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 60th anniversary of the U.
Baker's first wife was the daughter of another Republican leader of the Senate, Everett McKinley Dirksen of Illinois who, like Baker, knew how to forge compromises and largely was responsible for the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act when he supported President Lyndon Johnson's efforts.
As a result of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the black middle class were able to live wherever they wanted and could afford.
That's the question that the bipartisan legacy of the 1964 Civil Rights Act poses to today's Washington.
When I was a participant in the busing wars--arguing in court and elsewhere against busing for compulsory integration-someone would invariably later inform me that he had found the answer to the busing problem, namely that busing was prohibited by the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
The leader of Senate Republicans during passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act recalled, "Forty preachers caught me one afternoon there in that lobby.
But the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act outlawed discrimination in every part of American life, including the ballot box.
4) Less than a year after the Birmingham Children's Crusade, Congress passed the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which
The first part of the book reviews historical developments from emancipation up to the 1964 Civil Rights Act.