10-Year Treasury Note

(redirected from 10-Year Treasury Notes)

10-Year Treasury Note

A debt owed by the United States government for a period of 10 years. Each note has a stated interest rate, which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see 10-year Treasury Note interest rates as indicative of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for the Notes and rises with lower demand. For example, in December 2008, 10-year interest rates were the lowest in history due to deteriorating economic conditions and the consequent desire of investors for low-risk investments. See also: yield, bond, treasury note, treasury bond, treasury bill.
References in periodicals archive ?
As of midday, the yield on 10-year Treasury notes had ticked up to 2.
10-year Treasury notes were last up 30/32 in price to yield 1.
While the spread between long- and short-dated Treasuries has narrowed of late, which tends to happen as the economy slows, the difference between the two-year and 10-year Treasury notes is more than two percentage points -- still a favorable sign for economic growth.
House Republicans have passed a bill tying the student lending rate to the interest rate of 10-year Treasury notes, with an additional 2.
Benchmark 10-year Treasury notes were trading 17/32 higher in price to yield 1.
The yen was dumped for the dollar in New York, spurred by higher interest rates on the benchmark 10-year Treasury notes that led to expectations of a widening disparity in interest rates between Japan and the United States, dealers said.
Davis points out that HUD Section 232 loans most typically follow a trajectory that parallels rate trends for 10-year Treasury notes.
Since that point in time, the yield on 10-year Treasury notes has fallen nearly 70 basis points, resulting in the strongly inverted yield curve we observe today.
There can be little doubt that exceptionally low interest rates on 10-year Treasury notes, and hence on home mortgages, have been a major factor in the recent surge of homebuilding and home turnover, and especially in the steep climb in home prices.
1 per cent combined ratio for 1986, when the yield on 10-year Treasury notes averaged 7.
The powerful pull of shrinking supply on the 30-year Treasury bond yield caused it to drop below the yield on 10-year Treasury notes at the start of 2000, defying the normal relationship between these yields implied by an upward sloping yield curve.
The 10-year Treasury notes were auctioned in minimum denominations of $1,000 with an interest coupon rate of 3-3/8 percent.