10-Year Treasury Note

10-Year Treasury Note

A debt owed by the United States government for a period of 10 years. Each note has a stated interest rate, which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see 10-year Treasury Note interest rates as indicative of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for the Notes and rises with lower demand. For example, in December 2008, 10-year interest rates were the lowest in history due to deteriorating economic conditions and the consequent desire of investors for low-risk investments. See also: yield, bond, treasury note, treasury bond, treasury bill.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yield on the key 10-year Treasury note took a curve for the worst, plunging to its lowest level against the two-year yield since 2007 and stoking fears of an imminent economic recession.
The yield curve on the US benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which briefly broke below the 2-year rate, also triggered fears over the state of the US economy.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which influences mortgage rates, was 2.37% late Wednesday, down sharply from 2.48% a week earlier.
The Bund is 3.6 bps lower at 0.003%, and the 10-year Treasury note is down 2.7 bps to 2.538%.
The 10-year Treasury note yield inched up to 2.886 per cent, continuing to pull back from recent lows.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.92 percent.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.93 percent Wednesday from 2.97 percent a week earlier.
The yield on two-year yield was 2.47%; the benchmark 10-year Treasury Note was at 2.93% and the yield on the 30-year Treasury Bond was lower at 3.09% by end of last week.
The benchmark 10-year Treasury note was lower at around 2.86 percent from four-year highs last week.
Already, the 10-year treasury note yield has increased by 100 basis points to 6.7 percent from 5.7 percent in December in anticipation of an interest rate hike.
The bloodbath in the bond market has now begun, as the yield on the US 10-year Treasury note risen above 2.65 per cent last week.
Unless inflation surges unexpectedly, a 3 percent yield for the 10-year Treasury note may not be likely.